Evidence

Alerts

The latest important research summarised

Short summaries of the latest health research presented in plain English to promote use of research by all members of society.

Alert

Omega-3 supplements do not prevent heart disease, stroke or death

Omega-3 fatty acid supplements from fish oils or plants have little or no effect on the risk of heart disease, stroke or overall death rates. This finding contradicts a widespread belief that omega-3 supplements are protective. Previous evidence in favour of omega-3 supplements is mainly derived from trials at high risk of bias. The better ...

Alert

Sodium thiosulfate reduces hearing loss in children treated with chemotherapy

Treatment with sodium thiosulfate alongside cisplatin chemotherapy can reduce hearing loss in children with a liver tumour called hepatoblastoma. The risk of hearing loss was reduced by 48% in children who had the combination treatment compared with those who had cisplatin only. This phase 3 trial involved 109 children with standard-risk hepatoblastoma and tested the ...

Alert

Amphetamines probably the best first-choice treatment for adults with ADHD

There is further evidence to support the amphetamines as the most effective group of drugs for treating adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in the short-term. Two of these drugs were shown to provide the most improvement in core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, are tolerated as well as any other drug treatment and ...

Alert

Tools for GPs can help reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing

Interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections are most effective when they provide a negotiation tool to support patient interaction. These interventions are more likely to be rejected if they are perceived as interfering with individual clinical judgment or damaging patient relationships. Upper respiratory tract infections often resolve themselves within a ...

Alert

Supporting families of those in intensive care improved family satisfaction but didn’t reduce family distress

A multicomponent support intervention for family members of patients in intensive care didn’t reduce their anxiety, depression or distress around the overall experience. However, it increased satisfaction with the quality of staff communication and delivery of care. Family members of critically unwell patients on intensive care often need to be involved in care decisions. Yet ...

Alert

Closing five emergency departments not linked with increased hospital admissions, though ambulance call-outs increased

Closure of five small emergency departments in England was not associated with change in the number of hospital admissions, urgent care attendances or deaths among the local populations. However, ambulance call-outs increased by 14% relative to comparison areas, with a four-minute increase in the time to reach a hospital with an emergency department. Emergency departments ...

Alert

Albumin administrations can prolong survival for some people with liver disease

Weekly intravenous albumin can prolong the life for people with liver cirrhosis and uncomplicated ascites. Over about 18 months, 17% of patients given albumin died compared with 22% given standard care alone over 11 months. People with very severe (end-stage) cirrhosis develop various complications including a build-up of fluid in the abdomen (ascites). This is ...

Alert

Self-monitoring of blood glucose provides no important benefit for most people with type 2 diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes who monitor their blood glucose themselves may see small, short-term improvements in blood sugar control. This is not enough to be clinically important or outweigh the costs and personal inconvenience of long-term self-testing. Self-monitoring is a well-established strategy for type 1 diabetes and for people with type 2 who need ...

Alert

MRI scan does not help to find the cause of pelvic pain in women

MRI scans are not sufficiently accurate to find the cause of chronic pelvic pain in women and should not replace laparoscopy (keyhole surgery), which can be used for diagnosis and often treatment. MRI only correctly ruled out a gynaecological condition in half of women judged to have no obvious cause and missed half of women ...

Alert

The blood-thinner apixaban is less likely to cause major bleeding than warfarin

People who take apixaban to prevent blood clots are less likely to suffer major bleeding complications than those taking warfarin. Findings are similar in different groups of people, such as those with irregular heart rhythm (atrial fibrillation) and those who have had joint replacement surgery. Warfarin has long been used as an anticoagulant but needs ...

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