Evidence

Alerts

The latest important research summarised

Short summaries of the latest health research presented in plain English to promote use of research by all members of society.

Alert

The benefits and harms of aspirin for people with type 2 diabetes are finely balanced

Daily aspirin reduced the risk of serious vascular events among people with diabetes, while increasing the risk of major bleeding to a similar extent. Aspirin prevented one person in every 100 from having a heart attack or stroke over seven years, but an additional person per 100 experienced a major bleed. The ASCEND study is ...

Alert

New insights into living with inflammatory bowel disease

Living with inflammatory bowel disease as a `hidden’ condition can lead to feelings of isolation and exclusion. These experiences are characterised by exhaustion, feelings of damaged body image, loss of control and living with the fear of complications. The condition can be unpredictable and have a profound impact on quality of life, disrupting social relationships ...

Alert

New airway device as good as tracheal tube insertion for out-of-hospital resuscitation

A supraglottic airway device works as well as a tracheal tube for paramedics resuscitating patients in cardiac arrest and is simpler to use. People who have stopped breathing need to get air into their lungs urgently. Usually, a tube is placed through the vocal cords into their trachea to secure a reliable airway, but correct ...

Alert

Intravenous oxytocin reduces severe bleeding after vaginal delivery

Routine oxytocin injected directly into the bloodstream, rather than into the muscle, after birth results in fewer people suffering severe bleeding (postpartum haemorrhage). The overall rate of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) or side effects was similar between the groups, but the intravenous group had fewer severe haemorrhages, needed fewer blood transfusions and fewer admissions to high ...

Alert

Routine use of a mechanical compression device is no better than manual chest compression in cardiac arrest

Compared with manual compression, mechanical chest compression does not improve survival rates after cardiac arrest. However, in situations where manual compression may be difficult, such as in a moving ambulance, mechanical compression may still be an option. Each minute that a person waits for treatment after a cardiac arrest can make a difference of up ...

Alert

Steroids rapidly reduce children’s croup symptoms and shorten hospital stays

Corticosteroids reduce symptoms of croup in children within two hours and continue to do so for at least 24 hours. They also cut the amount of time children spend in hospital by 15 hours and reduce return visits or readmissions from about 20% to 10%. This Cochrane review assessed the effectiveness of corticosteroids such as ...

Alert

Partial knee replacements may save costs compared with total knee replacements

Partial knee replacements, when performed by experienced surgeons, can save costs and improve quality of life compared with total knee replacements. Partial replacements for selected patients improve quality of life and save between £600 and £2,000 over the patient’s lifetime, depending on age and gender. Knee replacements are commonly performed for people with ongoing pain and ...

Alert

Telemedicine programme can prolong life for heart failure patients

A comprehensive programme of daily telemedicine monitoring and 24-hour access to a physician-led hotline can reduce the number of deaths and the time spent in hospital, among patients with heart failure. A year-long study of 1,571 patients who had been admitted to hospital with heart failure within the past 12 months found that those assigned ...

Alert

Insulin pumps offer little value over multiple injections for children at the onset of diabetes

Young people newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes achieve similar blood glucose control by 12 months if they are treated with multiple daily insulin injections or continuously via an insulin pump. Adverse events are rare and occur at similar rates. Pumps are more expensive with no clear benefit to quality of life. Both regimens are used ...

Alert

Joint infection after hip replacement is linked to some risk factors that could be modified

Ten years of National Joint Registry data show that many factors may increase the risk of joint infection following hip replacement. Less than 1 in 1,000 people on average needed revision surgery for infection per year. Several modifiable patient factors increased risk, such as obesity and diabetes. Using ceramic components, and approaching surgery from the ...

979 Results 10 20 30 Results per page