Evidence
Alert

Psychiatric drugs given to children and adolescents have been ranked in order of safety

Dozens of drugs prescribed for psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents have been ranked in order of safety by an international team of psychiatrists. The drugs are prescribed for mental health conditions including depression, psychosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and mood disorders. All drugs can have unwanted side effects (adverse effects). The researchers looked ...

Alert

High rates of delirium, persistent fatigue and post-traumatic stress disorder were common after severe infection in previous coronavirus outbreaks

Little is known about the mental health consequences of severe COVID-19 illness because it is caused by a new coronavirus. Previous outbreaks caused by other coronaviruses (severe acute respiratory syndrome, SARS, and Middle East respiratory syndrome, MERS) may provide insights into ongoing problems after recovery from severe illness.  Researchers looked at reports of psychiatric problems ...

Alert

Most people caring for relatives with dementia experience loneliness

Around two-thirds of family carers of people with dementia experience loneliness. Almost half are moderately lonely and a fifth are severely lonely, reports one of the first large scale studies to look at this issue. Carers who felt lonely tended to have lower wellbeing, smaller social networks, and more stress associated with caregiving. A poor-quality ...

Alert

Some antidepressants can help people quit smoking, but other medications may offer greater benefits

Some anti-smoking medicines are designed specifically to reduce cravings for the nicotine in cigarettes. They include the drug varenicline and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), such as patches and gum. But medicines designed to treat depression may also help people to stop smoking. One antidepressant, called bupropion, can be prescribed as an anti-smoking medicine in the ...

Alert

Ambulance staff who respond to suicides need more support

UK ambulance staff report lasting and troubling memories of being called to suicides. But in a small qualitative study, they said there was little acknowledgment in the workplace that such events are traumatic. This is important since someone exposed to suicide is known to be themselves at greater risk of suicide. Each worker interviewed had ...

Alert

Therapists and patients have good quality interactions during telephone sessions

The quality of interactions between therapists and their patients is as good by telephone as in face-to-face sessions. A review of the evidence found little difference in the interaction regardless of how therapy was delivered. Telephone sessions were shorter but measures such as empathy and attentiveness, as well as patients’ readiness to disclose information, was ...

Alert

Social prescribing could empower patients to address non-medical problems in their lives

Many GP practices are exploring social prescribing, which is a way of linking patients to sources of support in the local community. Social prescribing addresses non-medical needs such as loneliness and financial difficulties. The NHS employs link workers to connect patients with local support networks. During the COVID-19 crisis, link workers may have an even ...

Collection

My Signals - Depression

In Collections, health and social care staff and service users tell us what research is important to them and why they feel others need to know about it. In this collection, we asked nine mental health practitioners and members of the public to tell us which Alerts have interested them most. Michelle Edgar A former ...

Alert

Increasing omega-3 intake does not prevent depression or anxiety

Increasing intake of polyunsaturated fats, for example with omega-3 fatty acid supplements, has little or no effect in preventing the onset of depression or anxiety symptoms in people without these conditions, but who might be at risk. These findings support dietary advice that omega-3 supplements are not needed in healthy people. This review also highlights ...

Alert

Occupational therapy at home may benefit people with dementia and their carers

Multiple occupational therapy sessions, provided in a person with dementia’s own home, improve their ability to carry out daily activities, compared with usual care. Improvements are also seen in behavioural and psychological symptoms and their quality of life. In addition, carers report feeling less distress, and a better quality of life. This study was a systematic ...

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