Evidence
Alert

Lamotrigine is not effective for the treatment of borderline personality disorder

Lamotrigine, a mood-stabilising drug, is not clinically effective for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Over one year follow up, this NIHR-funded trial did not find a difference between lamotrigine and placebo for borderline personality disorder-related symptoms and behavioural problems, depressive symptoms, self-harm, social functioning or quality of life outcomes. Borderline personality disorder is a ...

Alert

Cartoons are promising for reducing dental anxiety in children

Cartoons delivered on laptops, projectors or 3D goggles with sound can help distract anxious children who fear dental procedures. Dental anxiety can prevent children from attending the dentist for care, and this type of distraction could offer a useful tool to help them. This review looked at a range of audiovisual approaches tested in trials ...

Collection

My Signals - Nurses Collection

In My Signals, health and social care staff and service users tell us what research is important to them and why they feel others need to know about it. Join the conversation on Twitter and tell us which Signals have interested, excited or surprised you, using #MySignals. You can find the latest NIHR Signals here. In this collection, we ...

Alert

The most effective antidepressants for adults revealed in major review

Antidepressants are effective to treat moderate to severe depression in adults. Five antidepressants appear more effective and better tolerated than others. A major review of 522 antidepressant trials found that all of the 21 drugs studied performed better than placebo, in short-term trials measuring response to treatment. However, effectiveness varied widely. Researchers ranked drugs by ...

Themed Review

Forward Thinking - Support for people with severe mental illness

Severe mental illness (SMI) affects somewhere between one in one hundred and one in two hundred adults. People with severe mental illness, like schizophrenia, psychosis or bipolar disorder, often experience poorer health and, as a result, die sooner than others. Psychotic illnesses can have a profound effect on people and their families, and appropriate and ...

Alert

Additional therapy helps social recovery from first episode psychosis

Social recovery therapy increases structured activity, such as work, education or sport, by eight hours per week for people with severe social withdrawal following a first episode of psychosis. This cognitive behavioural type of treatment was added to other early interventions and might be particularly useful for those lacking motivation or living with other conditions ...

Alert

A primary care intervention helps older people with depression

Enhanced case management (also called collaborative care) added to primary care reduced symptoms in people with clinical depression, compared with usual primary care. The benefit was similar to other depression treatments. However, the small benefit over usual care was not sustained to 12 months. This NIHR-funded UK trial was carried out among nearly 500 adults ...

Alert

Supported employment helps people with severe mental illness to obtain work

Adults with schizophrenia and other psychosis receiving supported employment were more than twice as likely to obtain a job in the competitive labour market as those receiving pre-job training, sheltered employment or psychiatric care only. Supported employment seemed most effective when augmented with other interventions such as social or cognitive skills training. Many people with ...

Alert

Uncertain benefit of adding amisulpiride to clozapine for treatment-resistant schizophrenia

For adults with schizophrenia who continue to have symptoms despite treatment with the antipsychotic drug clozapine, adding amisulpride (another antipsychotic) was not shown to improve their chance of responding. It is not yet clear whether a larger trial would show an effect, as too few people were recruited to the NIHR-funded trial to be sure. ...

Alert

Talking therapy may relieve high levels of anxiety about health conditions

A specific talking therapy called ‘cognitive behavioural therapy for health anxiety’ may help people who are excessively worried about their health. Health anxiety reduced by a small, but meaningful amount, among the medical outpatients who were identified and treated. Delivered in one-hour sessions every two weeks, therapy lasted about four months. It was provided by ...

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