Evidence
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British-Bangladeshi parents offer better nutrition to their children when interventions involve the community

Participants discuss the Nurture Early for Optimal Nutrition (NEON) study.  The video transcript is available here.   Efforts to help parents feed and care for young children should be developed with the input and assistance of relevant ethnic communities, a new study shows. Different generations within the British-Bangladeshi population of East London offered key information ...

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Intravenous nutrition is more costly than feeding by stomach tube, with few added benefits

Critically ill people need some form of feeding to give them protein and energy. The NIHR funded this multicentre trial to compare the costs and effects of early intravenous nutritional support with enteral feeding, feeding by tube into the stomach or the intestine. Death rates and other important outcomes were similar when using either route. ...

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Working in partnership with a British South Asian community could improve control of children’s asthma

Children from South Asian communities fare worse than others when they have asthma. They are diagnosed later and are more likely to need emergency treatment. Researchers worked with South Asian communities in Leicester to understand what needs to be done to increase asthma diagnoses and improve management among children. The Management and Interventions for Asthma ...

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Group programmes for weight loss may be more effective than one-to-one sessions

People with obesity may be more likely to lose weight if they attend group sessions for weight loss programmes, rather than having one-to-one support. New research found that people attending groups had more treatment time and were more likely to lose enough weight to make a difference to their health.  Much previous research has established ...

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People with thyroid cancer who are asked to follow a low iodine diet need clear information

People with thyroid cancer who were asked to adjust their diet ahead of treatment, were confused about what they needed to do. The first UK study of these patients’ experiences found that many restricted their diet more and for longer than is advised. Some reported conflict or distress associated with the diet and were anxious ...

Collection

Diabetes

The impact of diabetes and the challenges it presents individual patients, their families and health services is a major issue of interest and concern. At present an estimated 3.5 million people in the UK have been diagnosed with diabetes but it is predicted that up to a further 549,00 people have diabetes that is yet ...

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Increasing omega-3 intake does not prevent depression or anxiety

Increasing intake of polyunsaturated fats, for example with omega-3 fatty acid supplements, has little or no effect in preventing the onset of depression or anxiety symptoms in people without these conditions, but who might be at risk. These findings support dietary advice that omega-3 supplements are not needed in healthy people. This review also highlights ...

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Very small babies appear not to be affected by the rate of increasing milk feeds

A large-scale trial has found that the speed of increasing milk feed volumes in low birth weight or very low gestational age babies who are on intravenous feeding does not influence outcomes. This NIHR-funded study randomised preterm (below 32 weeks) or very low birth weight (less than 1,500g) babies to receive either daily milk feed ...

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Boosting omega-3 fatty acid intake is unlikely to prevent type 2 diabetes

Increasing the intake of polyunsaturated fats in the diet with supplements of omega-3 fatty acids, for example, is unlikely to affect people’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, this review only looked at the effect of supplements on diabetes, not wider health. This large systematic review included 83 long-term trials comparing higher and lower ...

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Meaningful increases in physical activity levels after cancer can be sustained for three months or more

People who have had cancer, who are able to keep mobile, can benefit from interventions aimed at increasing physical activity. Being active regularly is already known to improve health and may also reduce the risk of cancer returning and improve life expectancy. This NIHR-funded review looked at what kinds of exercise interventions can lead to ...

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