Evidence
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What support do young people with sickle cell disease need when moving into adult services?

Young people with sickle cell disease may experience poor care in non-specialist settings when they transition from paediatric to adult health services. New research from This Sickle Cell Life project studied their experiences on general hospital wards and during unplanned visits to A&E departments. The research found that young people would have better experiences of ...

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People with anaemia may not benefit from iron therapy ahead of major abdominal surgery, research finds

People with anaemia who were due to have major abdominal surgery did not see the expected benefits from receiving iron infusions in advance. A new study found that iron infusions did not reduce blood transfusions or deaths compared to a dummy treatment with salt water (placebo). There was no reduction in complications while people were ...

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Tackling fear and misinformation may help increase hepatitis C testing in prison

Liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health burden. The World Health Organisation is aiming to eliminate HCV as a public health problem by 2030 and testing in prisons is central to this campaign. People entering prison are asked to have a test for blood-borne viruses including HCV, but ...

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Most patients undergoing planned surgery do not need compression stockings

Compression stockings might be unnecessary for patients at moderate or high risk of blood clots who are undergoing planned surgery. A study called GAPS suggests that anti-clotting medicine alone is just as effective as using it in combination with compression stockings.  Researchers involved in the large randomised controlled study recommend that guidelines for preventing blood ...

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Age of stored blood used for transfusions in critically ill children doesn’t affect outcomes

Using more recently-collected red blood cells for transfusions does not reduce organ dysfunction, infection or risk of death in critically ill children, compared with blood that has been stored for longer. This large, international trial included more than 1,500 children in paediatric intensive care units. The study provides robust evidence to support the continued practice ...

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Continuing an anticoagulant at home after abdominal surgery cuts thrombosis risk

Continuing to take low molecular weight heparin for two to four weeks after major abdominal surgery significantly reduces the risk of developing a dangerous blood clot. A review of seven studies, mainly in cancer surgery, has found that 13% of patients who received anticoagulant treatment only during their hospital stay developed a clot in the ...

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Significant risk of another thrombosis remains if anticoagulation is stopped

Unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis in the leg and pulmonary embolism, are clots within veins that occur spontaneously in people without risk factors and are treated with anticoagulant drugs. If those drugs are stopped after three months or more, the risk of another clot appears to be on average 10% in the ...

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A temporary clot-catching filter inserted after major trauma does not prevent lung clots

In adults after major trauma who cannot safely be given anti-clotting drugs, placing a removable metal filter in a major vein to the heart (the inferior vena cava) within 3 days of admission does not reduce their chances of having a clot in their lungs (pulmonary embolus) within 90 days, compared with having no filter. ...

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Reminders to assess clotting risk increase the use of preventive measures

Reminders to assess clotting risk result in more patients being given appropriate anti-clotting measures in hospital. Computer alerts, in particular, are linked to better choice of prophylaxis and fewer blood clots in veins. Clots in deep leg veins or the lungs are common when people are bedbound in hospital. This updated Cochrane review assessed interventions ...

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Prolonging anticoagulant treatment after abdominal cancer surgery reduces clot risk

People who have low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for between two to four weeks after abdominal or pelvic surgery, especially for cancer, have fewer blood clots in their large veins or lungs. In this review of seven trials, five per cent of people receiving extended treatment experienced a clot compared with 13% who received LMWH ...

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