Evidence
Alert

Better access to healthcare for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities is key to increasing vaccination rates: research makes five recommendations

Better access to healthcare services is the most important step in improving vaccination rates for people in Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities. New research suggests that easier access is more important than addressing beliefs about vaccine safety or the need for vaccination. Researchers set up a series of workshops for healthcare providers and representatives of ...

Themed Review

Living with Covid19 – Second review

A dynamic review of the evidence around ongoing Covid19 (often called Long Covid). You can also download this review as a PDF. Executive summary NIHR Centre for Engagement and Dissemination What are we aiming to achieve with our Living with Covid19 reviews? Framing the evidence What is ‘Long Covid’? How many people who have had ...

Alert

People with chronic fatigue syndrome want to be taken seriously and to receive personalised, empathetic care

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex, long-term condition that dramatically limits people's activities. It is also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). People with CFS/ME are exhausted for no reason; rest does not help and it can take days or weeks to recover from any activity. Some describe 'brain fog' and problems with memory, concentration ...

Alert

A combination of tests is needed to diagnose a dangerous type of meningitis in children

Meningitis caused by tuberculosis (TB) is rare in the UK, but it is a dangerous disease which can be fatal or leave people with disabilities. Children are particularly vulnerable to poor outcomes. TB is better known for causing lung disease, but the bacteria can also infect the brain, causing TB meningitis. The disease is often ...

Alert

Men who have sex with men are less likely to use drugs to prevent HIV if they are young, unemployed or have a low disposable income, research finds

The use of drugs to reduce the transmission of HIV has increased substantially in recent years. New research found that two in five men who have sex with men (MSM) attending sexual health clinics in London and Brighton had taken drugs as a precaution in case they encounter the virus. At the time of the ...

Themed Review

Living with Covid19 - webinars

The NIHR Centre for Engagement and Dissemination has recently published the 'Living with Covid19' review compiling the current state of knowledge on ongoing Covid19 symptoms. Our review is seeking to frame a dialogue with the public, health and social care professionals, researchers, service providers and policy makers to better understand the issues around living with ...

Alert

National infection control campaigns led to a rapid decline in superbug infections in UK intensive care units

In the early 2000s, bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics were widespread in UK hospitals and a strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) posed a major threat to public health. This led to nationwide infection control programmes in the mid-2000s, with a rapid decline in rates in NHS hospitals over the following decade. This study ...

Alert

Testing for hepatitis in A&E departments is likely to be cost-effective in many areas of the UK

Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments may be a cost-effective location for testing for hepatitis, new research has found. Rates of hepatitis are higher among A&E patients than in the general population. This is because hepatitis is more common among marginalised communities - including people who are homeless or who inject drugs - and they attend ...

Themed Review

Living with Covid19

A dynamic review of the evidence around ongoing Covid19 symptoms (often called Long Covid). Key Messages Introduction What are we aiming to achieve with our Living with Covid19 review? Drawing on people’s experience How many people live with ongoing Covid19? Symptoms Diagnostic uncertainty Research into living with Covid19 Capturing the experience of ‘Long Covid’ Services ...

Alert

Brain and nerve complications are more common than expected in younger patients with severe COVID-19

People aged under 60 who are hospitalised with COVID-19 are more likely than expected to experience severe psychiatric symptoms. Research found that altered mental states such as psychosis are being reported in these younger patients.  It confirmed that strokes and other neurological symptoms are common in severe COVID-19. An initial study included 153 cases reported ...

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