Evidence
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Statins do not commonly cause muscle pain and stiffness

Statins are a group of drugs which lower levels of fat (cholesterol) in the blood. They reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke. Despite this, many people prescribed statins stop taking them, sometimes through concerns about side effects. New research finds that statins do not commonly cause pain, stiffness and weakness in the muscles. ...

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Stroke care could be improved when patients, staff and researchers work together

Stroke survivors, stroke unit staff and researchers worked together in a partnership aimed at increasing inpatients' activity after a stroke. It was the first time that this joint approach has been trialled in stroke units. This research explores what measures helped make the partnership work, and what the barriers were.   People who receive early specialist ...

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Aspirin could reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in people with pneumonia, research suggests

People with pneumonia are at high risk of having a heart attack or stroke. New research suggests that taking aspirin may reduce the risk of these cardiovascular events. Pneumonia is swelling (inflammation) of the tissue in one or both lungs. It is usually caused by bacterial infection but can also be caused by viruses, including ...

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Paramedics value a structured handover of care for patients with suspected stroke

Stroke is a medical emergency that often results in serious disability. A drug treatment called thrombolysis improves the chance of recovery in some patients but can only be given in hospital in the first few hours after a stroke. A coordinated emergency response involving ambulance and hospital services is needed to identify the patients who ...

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Stroke survivors with vision impairments need personalised rehabilitation and greater support

People who survive a stroke but suffer loss of vision do not always receive the care they need. A group of patients in northwest England said the rehabilitation they received was not personalised. Some had met with apathy from health professionals. Focus groups and interviews revealed that patients with loss of vision experience long-term emotional, ...

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Fluoxetine does not improve outcomes after stroke

Many people experience disability after a stroke, such as weakness in the arm or leg, or problems with language and communication. The antidepressant drug fluoxetine has been used to reduce disability following a stroke but it is unclear how effective it is. The first of three large-scale trials into the impact of fluoxetine in stroke ...

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New research supports the move to raise the blood pressure target for frail older people

Frail older people may not benefit from the same tight blood pressure control that has been shown to benefit relatively younger, healthier groups in existing trials. The medical records of more than 400,000 patients in primary care were reviewed. The researchers found that lower than normal blood pressures were associated with a higher death rate ...

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Tranexamic acid is safe to use following mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury and reduces deaths

In people with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury, tranexamic acid (a drug which reduces bleeding) given within three hours of injury reduces the risk of death by 22%. This effect is seen in a subgroup of those who are less severely affected. This NIHR-funded multi-centre international trial randomised 12,737 adults with intracranial bleeding to receive either ...

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Computerised speech and language therapy can help people with aphasia find words following a stroke

People with aphasia caused by a stroke show improvements in retrieving words when they use self-managed computerised speech and language therapy in addition to usual care from a speech and language therapist. No improvements are seen in patients’ conversational abilities or their quality of life. Aphasia is a complex language and communication disorder. It can affect people’s ...

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On balance, antiplatelet drugs may be restarted for stroke survivors who have bled into the brain

Early research suggests that antiplatelet drugs, such as aspirin, can provide more benefit than harm if restarted at about 2 to 3 months after a brain bleed. The results seem to apply best to those patients with a good prognosis who survive with less disability. Antiplatelet drugs are of proven benefit to those with a ...

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