Evidence
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Two common operations to fix a broken tibia have similar outcomes

In people who had broken the lower part of their tibia (shin bone), fixation using a metal rod nailed to the inside of the bone was compared with a locking plate screwed onto the surface of the bone. There was no difference in the quality of life, disability or pain at 12 months for people who ...

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Starting antiretroviral therapy immediately after HIV diagnosis reduces transmission of the virus

Giving antiretroviral therapy to people newly diagnosed with HIV may be an effective and cost-effective way of reducing new infections. Increased HIV testing in at-risk populations may identify more people for treatment and also reduce infection rates. Using data from a number of sources including NIHR funded projects, researchers developed a computer simulation model. The ...

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Supported employment helps people with severe mental illness to obtain work

Adults with schizophrenia and other psychosis receiving supported employment were more than twice as likely to obtain a job in the competitive labour market as those receiving pre-job training, sheltered employment or psychiatric care only. Supported employment seemed most effective when augmented with other interventions such as social or cognitive skills training. Many people with ...

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Giving oxygen routinely after a stroke does not improve outcomes

There was no benefit to routinely giving oxygen to people who have had a stroke. Oxygen given continuously, or just overnight, did not reduce disability or death and it did not improve people’s ability to do everyday tasks or live independently. There were no oxygen-related adverse events reported. Strokes occur when the blood supply to ...

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A strategy of 'delayed antibiotic prescribing' for respiratory infections may reduce antibiotic use

Delaying antibiotic prescribing made little difference to most symptoms of respiratory infection. It reduced antibiotic use and did not affect patient satisfaction compared with immediate prescribing of antibiotics. Increasing antibiotic resistance is a global health concern. Many people don’t realise that viruses cause most respiratory infections and that antibiotics won’t help. The strategy allows some time ...

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Hearing aids make communication easier for people with mild hearing loss

Hearing aids for people with mild-to-moderate hearing loss make communication easier and improve listening ability. Quality of life improved alongside the improvements in hearing. There were no reports of adverse effects for hearing aids. Hearing loss can have a far-reaching impact on people’s mental and physical health, taking a toll on their quality of life. ...

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Transfusing blood close to its use-by date does not increase deaths in critically ill adults

Transfusing more recently-collected red blood cells does not improve the chance of survival for critically-ill people who need blood transfusions, compared with blood that has been stored for longer. This large international study included almost 5,000 critically ill people in intensive care units. Participants were transfused with either the freshest compatible blood available (mean storage ...

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Alternative drug may prevent atrial fibrillation following heart surgery

After heart surgery around a third of people have atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heart rhythm, which impedes their recovery and lengthens hospital stay. Colchicine treatment could reduce this complication by about a third. About 11 people would need this treatment to prevent one of them developing atrial fibrillation. Using amiodarone, an alternative drug commonly used ...

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Fewer large babies are born to pregnant woman with type 1 diabetes if their glucose was monitored continuously

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes who used a continuous glucose monitoring system were half as likely to have a large baby compared with those using standard finger prick blood glucose measurements. Only 15% of infants needed intensive care admissions due to low blood glucose in the continuous glucose monitoring group, compared with 28% born ...

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Lying on one’s side in labour with an epidural is safe and leads to more spontaneous births

Women who lie on their side in the second stage of labour after a low-dose epidural are more likely to give birth spontaneously than those who remain upright when actively contracting. Lying down on either side doesn’t appear to be harmful to mothers or babies. This means that 17 of these women would need to ...

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